Mastering Self–Communication

One of the most important skills to master in our life is self-communication.

What thoughts are swirling around in your head on a daily basis? Are you aware of them? These thoughts inhibit our life force and energy, especially in times of uncertainty and worry.

It’s interesting to note that in many Asian countries, it is called the ‘monkey mind’ that needs to be tamed.

Why is this so important?

If we pay attention to the voice in our head, we will notice that it is often belittling, negative, and detrimental to reaching our goals and ambitions. We can easily feel anxious and loose our courage before we even try to reach a goal.

The little voice’s whole aim and purpose is to keep us safe and secure for one important reason: whatever we have done in our life so far has been successful as we are still alive! Hence any change, new input, or unfamiliar situation is first of all considered to be a fret and not welcome.

The good news is that we can overcome the power of the little voice by consciously choosing our thoughts.

It’s not an easy task, I agree, but it can be done. The more we practice, the more successful we become in mastering the little voice in our head. Doing this allows us to thrive in life.

When emotions are held in check with our daily focus on the big picture, we become much more resilient towards frustration, anger, fear, disappointment, and our inner turmoil.

One great technique that does work, is to write your goals on a piece of paper without censoring it. It doesn’t take more than five minutes.

Do this every single morning to reset the compass of your self-communication and focus and it will be life-changing. Keep the paper with you during the day and whenever needed, have a glance at it.

Try this for 90 days and you’ll see your life transform.

All it needs is your commitment to the 5-minute daily routine to master your inner self-communication.

Spread the love

Author

Similar posts

Conference Presenting: Back to Basics

It’s that time of the year when organizations are gearing up for client conferences. Below are three suggestions that I find myself reminding all of my clients to include in their presentations. Give your listeners a reason to listen.  We call this a benefit statement, or I often refer to it as W.I.I.F.M. (What’s In It For Me).  It answers the question, “What is your presentation going to give listeners?” Think about your overall message

Spread the love

The Unique Challenges of Neurodiverse Communication in the Workplace

As an Executive Communication Coach, I’m thrilled to see Neurodiversity becoming more recognized and celebrated at work. However, its nuances in the workplace can cause frustration and miscommunications. For example, if you work with someone who rarely makes eye contact, you might assume they are shy, nervous, or uncomfortable. Using eye contact is an essential nonverbal communication behavior that most of us use automatically in work interactions. Eye contact helps people communicate their interest and

Spread the love

Why Your Team May be Failing at Presentations

Usually, team presentations are done when the stakes are high and the consequences are critical, requiring subject matter experts to weigh in on their topic. These presentations are most often geared toward complex projects, strategic alliances, acquisitions, etc. Of course, they all have large sums of money involved. Team presentations have many more challenges than individual ones. Most teams preparing on their own without a speech coach will spend all of their preparation time on

Spread the love

QUESTIONS? NEED HELP?

Tell us what’s on your mind: