Are women better managers than men?

A recent article on the New York Times titled: “No Doubts: Women Are Better Managers” sparked this reaction from Coach Laurie Schloff.

Communication Coach Laurie Schloff of The Speech Improvement Company (Boston and Tampa) agrees with Carol Smith (right) of the Elle Group that women are often better managers, but based on her work with hundreds of females aiming for the C level she cautions ambitious females:

1. Women are still cut little slack in terms of ‘acceptable’ management behaviors.

Not only do you have to be viewed as competent, you must also be warm and nice.

Remember the Hillary Clinton candidacy lesson. She was widely viewed as too “bossy”until she shed a tear at a New Hampshire press conference, Glad that Carol Smith learned not to be bossy back in sixth grade. Many of Schloff’s client’s have tried to show strength by being tough, and though that works for some males, it almost always translates into bad press for women (Think the word that rhymes with rich).

2.Women who are too nice also suffer.

One client described her boss as “Pollyanna” always looking for the good side. Carol Smith wisely trained herself to give direct and specific feedback and to tell her reports HOW to improve. Many of my senior female clients avoid Carol’s wise ways for one reason that doesn’t work in the workplace.

They are afraid to hurt someone’s feelings.

Laurie will be hosting the following event: “Effective Presentations Certificate Program” on July 30/31st 2009.
Schloff’s advice: Get over it!

Spread the love

Author

Similar posts

The Unique Challenges of Neurodiverse Communication in the Workplace

As an Executive Communication Coach, I’m thrilled to see Neurodiversity becoming more recognized and celebrated at work. However, its nuances in the workplace can cause frustration and miscommunications. For example, if you work with someone who rarely makes eye contact, you might assume they are shy, nervous, or uncomfortable. Using eye contact is an essential nonverbal communication behavior that most of us use automatically in work interactions. Eye contact helps people communicate their interest and

Spread the love

Why Your Team May be Failing at Presentations

Usually, team presentations are done when the stakes are high and the consequences are critical, requiring subject matter experts to weigh in on their topic. These presentations are most often geared toward complex projects, strategic alliances, acquisitions, etc. Of course, they all have large sums of money involved. Team presentations have many more challenges than individual ones. Most teams preparing on their own without a speech coach will spend all of their preparation time on

Spread the love

Controlling Nervousness Before Speaking – 30-minute Recorded Webinar

Whether you call it ’nervousness” or “anxiety’ or “fear of speaking,” it is a widespread experience for many people worldwide; you are not alone. The good news is that it can be controlled. In this 30-minute recording, we discuss the ‘real causes’ of this experience and some tools and techniques to control the nervousness. WATCH NOW Spread the love

Spread the love

QUESTIONS? NEED HELP?

Tell us what’s on your mind: