07 Dec Everything Communicates!

As an Executive Communication Coach, my job is to remind clients that when presenting, everything communicates – how you look, how you sound and what you do with your body. Mary Lou Andre, a nationally recognized wardrobe, dress code and corporate image consultant, got me thinking about this after reading her excellent article: Is Hosiery History? 

Her advice on this business appropriate accessory reinforces how important clothing is in communicating respect for yourself and others. The way we present ourselves is our personal brand. The way in which we build trust and rapport with listeners is first conveyed through what we are wearing.

When you ask a group of listeners what’s the first thing they notice about the speaker, they’ll often say in unison,”How they look.” Before the speaker even opens his/her mouth, impressions are being formed about whether they are confident and project to the right level of gravitas. 

For women, this means paying attention to detail. Conveying a strong ‘executive presence’ means wearing clothing that is stylish, well-fitted and thoughtfully assembled.  When done properly, I believe it helps us “speak with confidence.”

Monica Murphy is a senior coaching partner with The Speech Improvement Company.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditlinkedinmail
Monica
Monica Murphy
monica@speechimprovement.com

05 Dec Pun Intended

Since we’re all about words, we really enjoy it when people have fun with them. Like these puns below. Some are really funny, some are simply clever, and some will make you groan. You’ve been warned.

  1. No matter how much you push the envelope, it’ll still be stationery.
  2. If you don’t pay your exorcist you get repossessed.
  3. I’m reading a book about anti-gravity. I just can’t put it down.
  4. I didn’t like my beard at first. Then it grew on me.
  5. Did you hear about the crossed-eyed teacher who lost her job because she couldn’t control her pupils?
  6. When you get a bladder infection, urine trouble.
  7. When chemists die, they barium.
  8. I stayed up all night to see where the sun went, and then it dawned on me.
  9. I changed my iPod’s name to Titanic. It’s syncing now.
  10. England has no kidney bank, but it does have a Liverpool.
  11. Haunted French pancakes give me the crepes.
  12. This girl today said she recognized me from the Vegetarians Club, but I’d swear I’ve never met herbivore
  13. I know a guy who’s addicted to brake fluid, but he says he can stop any time.
  14. A thief who stole a calendar got twelve months.
  15. When the smog lifts in Los Angeles U.C.L.A.
  16. The batteries were given out free of charge.
  17. A dentist and a manicurist married. They fought tooth and nail.
  18. A will is a dead giveaway.
  19. With her marriage, she got a new name and a dress.
  20. A boiled egg is hard to beat.
  21. When you’ve seen one shopping center you’ve seen a mall.
  22. Police were summoned to a daycare center where a three-year-old was resisting a rest.
  23. Did you hear about the fellow whose entire left side was cut off? He’s all right now.
  24. A bicycle can’t stand alone; it’s just two tired.
  25. The guy who fell onto an upholstery machine is now fully recovered.
  26. He had a photographic memory which was never developed.
  27. When she saw her first strands of grey hair she thought she’d dye.
  28. Acupuncture is a jab well done. That’s the point of it.
  29. Those who get too big for their pants will be totally exposed in the end.
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditlinkedinmail
Jeff Turner
Jeff Turner
jturner@speechimprovement.com

26 Nov Break a Leg?!?

Since we do a lot of training for public speaking, many of our clients find themselves in front of people on a stage. We got to thinking whether wishing them success by saying “break a leg” was an appropriate use of the term. That got us wondering where did that expression come from, and why is it used for performances, primarily among actors, musicians and dancers?

It certainly plays on the superstition that wishing someone well before going out on stage will somehow jinx them, so you hope for the opposite by wishing them bad luck. And while the exact origin is unclear, there are a number of theories for the story behind it: (more…)

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditlinkedinmail
Read More
Jeff Turner
Jeff Turner
jturner@speechimprovement.com

08 Nov I Say “um” Too Much

Vocalized pauses or fillers, including um, uh, ah, and their close relatives like, you know, and OK? are some of the most common concerns brought to a speech coach.  We don’t um want to uh get too um picky here, since 1 to 3 percent of everyone’s speech normally contains hesitations, and folks like Ted Kennedy have spoken successfully in public life despite long aah pauses.  However, a bad case of um-itis makes you annoying to listen to.  So why do so many of us um along in life?  Most often, vocalized pauses function as a way to fill up space as we formulate the next thought.  Though old habits take some time to break, it is possible to banish the ums and ahs forever. (more…)

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditlinkedinmail
Read More
Laurie Schloff
laurie@speechimprovement.com

03 Nov Helping Startups Startup at MassChallenge

One of the reasons Boston is the best place to start a company (take THAT Silicon Valley) is because of organizations like MassChallenge (www.masschallenge.org) who bill themselves as “the most startup-friendly accelerator…no equity and not-for-profit, we are obsessed with helping entrepreneurs across all industries.”

And their stats are impressive: 835 startups accelerated, 6,500 jobs created, $1.1 billion in outside funding raised. Currently across all their locations, they have 326 young companies taking advantage of all they have to offer.

They turned to The Speech Improvement Company to help their entrepreneurs be better communicators. Two of our experienced coaches, Dinneen Grably and Tori Hollingworth (more…)

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditlinkedinmail
Read More
Jeff Turner
Jeff Turner
jturner@speechimprovement.com

27 Oct Speak With Confidence and Remove All Doubt

In today’s fast-moving communication-driven world, messages are conveyed through many mediums. “Speaking with confidence” means avoiding tentative language. Non-concrete or tentative language in business shows a lack of self-confidence and will not deliver the strength of your intention to the listeners.

For example:

Non-concrete – “I hope I’ve given you a good overview of our team.”
Concrete – “This gives you a clear overview of our team.”

Non-concrete – “I guess I can deliver this talk confidently.”
Concrete – “I can deliver this talk confidently.”

Watch out for these words in your opening thoughts and phrases, particularly when speaking: I think, I hope, I guess, maybe, kind of, and sort of.

(more…)

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditlinkedinmail
Read More
Monica
Monica Murphy
monica@speechimprovement.com

23 Aug Controlling Nervousness and Working with Visual Aids

This video covers how to control the fear of public speaking and how to work with visual aids.  In 2002, Apple Computer partnered with The Speech Improvement Company Inc., to promote better public speaking.  Dr. Ethan F. Becker flew to Cupertino to record this 30 minute webinar, which lived on Apple’s website for the next 6 years!

We hope you find it helpful. Runtime  30 min.

Apple Computer and The Speech Improvement Company from SpeechImprovement on Vimeo.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditlinkedinmail
Dr. Ethan Becker
Dr. Ethan Becker
ethan@speechimprovement.com

08 Jul Crisis Management

Dr. Ethan F. Becker teaching Crisis Management at the RAZAK School of Government in Malaysia.  The intention of the seminar was to help leaders understand how to communicate effectively during crisis situations.   When leaders and managers are not prepared to communicate predictability, safety, and control, the results can be devastating.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditlinkedinmail
Dr. Ethan Becker
Dr. Ethan Becker
ethan@speechimprovement.com

19 Jun What’s in it for listeners?

Prepare & Organize for Business Speaking       

Tell the listeners why they should listen to you talk about this topic.  Whether or not they ultimately agree with you, how do you expect them to benefit by listening?  Some benefits that you might mention as reasons why they should listen to you include:

 

  • Making their jobs easier.
  • Improving their health.
  • Relieving stress.
  • Stimulating creativity.
  • Providing security.
  • Increasing their income.

 

As a speaker, you should be able to tell at least one, and maybe more, good reasons why they should listen to you.  The intent is to give your listeners a clear understanding of why your ideas are valuable.  Many speakers find this the most difficult of all steps in the four-step outline.  Business speakers frequently say things like, “They know why this is important,” or “They invited me to speak, I’m sure they know the value of what I’m saying.”  This is a big mistake.  There will be times when listeners have no clear idea how your thoughts apply to them.  Perhaps their boss told them to attend.  Maybe they came with friends.  Maybe they came to make friends by networking.  In any case, you cannot hurt your cause by giving a short, direct, answer to their question, “What’s in it for me?”  After all, if you can’t think of a reason for them to listen, they probably can’t either.  If you can’t identify the reasons why people should listen to you speak on a certain topic, then why are you speaking to them at all?

 

Monica Murphy is a senior coaching partner with The Speech Improvement Company

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditlinkedinmail
Monica
Monica Murphy
monica@speechimprovement.com